Not the End of Journalism

The untimely death of New York Times reporter & columnist David Carr felt like a death’s knell for the bygone days of tough-minded journalism. But his passing by no means represents the end of en era. Carr seemed to fit the stereotype of a Damon Runyan-like character who smoke, drank and typed his stories while […]

Share

The Problems of New Apps

To me, the more fundamental question is one that could be asked of the coverage of all new apps, whether in transportation, mobile technology, printing and much else: Are reporters and editors blinded by the sizzle of new ideas, to the extent that the articles they produce start off as largely adulatory and enthusiastic rather than objective and balanced?

Share

The Arc of the Ebola Crisis

The specter of contracting Ebola is a dystopian nightmare. Whether fear of the virus justified the media’s panic-fueling coverage is another matter. Here are some incontrovertible facts: Ebola is a frightening, often deadly scourge. It is highly contagious, but only when the infected person is showing unmistakable signs of the virus: fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and […]

Share

Newsroom Deck Chairs

By Paul Bernish This forum has devoted (perhaps to a fault) lots of words about the slow-motion decline of daily print newspapers. For good reason: for more than 200 years, daily newspapers were the primary source of information, opinion and perspective for successive generations of readers. Even with the advent of radio, movie news, and […]

Share

Newspaper Nightmares

By Paul Bernish Stop the presses! It’s not a good time to be in the newspaper business. This is surely not news; the impending death of daily newspaper journalism has been talked and written about for years. But as recent events demonstrate, print versions of news providers are definitely on life support. The question now […]

Share