Ready for FSMA?

Full compliance with the Food Safety Modernization Act is only a few months away — mid-September, in fact. Is the food industry ready? If they haven’t already, here’s what food manufacturers need to do:

Hazard Analysis — the first compliance step required of all but the smallest food manufacturers is a thorough analysis of any potential food safety problems in production plants and shipping areas. Remember, under the new FMSA, the core idea underlying regulatory oversight is prevention of food safety problems. The obvious place to start is in the production facility. Included in the hazard review are “foreseeable hazards,” which are possible trouble spots for contamination that must be dealt with. Here’s a link to hazard analysis implementation.
Food Safety Plan — after the hazard analysis, this is the logical next step for manufacturers, but also the requirement that will take up the most time to implement properly. FSMA requires manufacturers to lay out a step-by-step risk-based preventive control plans that identifies real and possible food contamination weaknesses, and what will be done to mitigate or address the problems. Additionally, FSMA requires that the appropriate production line employees be given thorough food safety training, with regular review sessions. A plan’s food safety plan also must include a specific recall procedure in the event one is needed. This requirement is especially important because food contamination events can create serious, even deadly, public health emergencies. How well affected product can be tracked back to the source, and how quickly it can be removed from sale, is an essential component of the new food safety law.

food-processing-industry-image-4697FSMA also applies to suppliers in the long and complex food chain. As an example, food production lines convey thousands of pounds of raw food ingredients every day. The machines that control the manufacturing process need regular maintenance to keep them in good running order. Maintenance is performed by employees assigned to the task, and these workers use lubricants that are specifically formulated for food production. The lubricants must be “food grade;” that is, they cannot be potentially harmful to food being produced. FSMA requires that suppliers of these lubricants also perform a hazard analysis in their production facilities, and then create their own food safety and recall plans — just in case. (NOTE: one of my clients, CRC Industries, Inc., mankes a variety of food grade lubricants).

Management Oversight — Perhaps the most controversial requirement of FSMA is a strengthened emphasis, backed by the force of possible legal action, on top management oversight of food safety. While this feature has long been assumed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the responsibility has been codified in the new food safety law. Top executives, including the CEO, can be held liable for food safety violations within their companies; using the so-called Park Doctrine, the FDA and the Department of Justice can mount civil and criminal actions against corporate executives whose companies become involved in a food safety crisis, even if the executives argue that they didn’t know about the safety problems and expected underlings to handle such matters.
The Food Safety Modernization Act is a watershed standard in food safety responsibility. The emphasis on prevention requires a higher level of vigilance for food manufacturers, their suppliers, as well as the companies that transport food products to warehouses and stores. It could reasonably be said that under FSMA, there can’t be enough food safety, which is a standard that could positively guide food production for years to come.

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